Windows Server 2012 R2 Cluster Reset Recent Events With PowerShell

I blogged before about the fact that since Windows Server 2012  we have the ability to reset the recent events shown so that the state of the cluster is squeaky clean with not warnings or errors. You can read up on this here. Windows Server 2012 Cluster Reset Recent Events Feature.

You can also do this in PowerShell like in the example below:

As you may notice, the RecentEventsResetTime is displayed in UTC when read form the cluster after connecting to it. Right after you set it it displays the time respectful of the time zone you’re in right until you connect to the cluster again. We demonstrate this in the 2 screenshots below (I’m at GMT+1).

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This comes in handy when writing test, comparison & demo scripts. Often you do things with the network that causes network connectivity to be lost when the NIC gets reset (disabled/enabled) and such. Also when something fails as part of the demo or tests scripts it’s nice to start the rerun or the next part of the demo/test with a clean cluster GUI when you’re showcasing stuff. Unfortunately an already GUI doesn’t refresh these setting if the reset is not done in the GUI. So you need to open a new one. For scripting you don’t have this issue. EDIT: In Windows 2012 R2 you can use the $MyCluster.Update() to reflect the new value of RecentEventsResetTime in UTC without having to reconnect to the cluster. In Windows Server 2012 this Update method isn’t available but it seems to happen automatic.

Moving Clustered Virtual Machines to Windows Server 2012 with the Cluster Migration Wizard

As you might remember I did a blog post on transitioning from a Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V cluster to Windows Server 2012 (well I was using the beta at the time, not the RC yet):

  1. Part 1 Upgrading Hyper-V Cluster Nodes to Windows Server 2012 (Beta) – Part 1
  2. Part 2 Upgrading Hyper-V Cluster Nodes to Windows Server 2012 (Beta) – Part 2
  3. Part 3 Upgrading Hyper-V Cluster Nodes to Windows Server 2012 (Beta) – Part 3

Microsoft has now blogged about the process themselves and they use the migration wizard in Failover Cluster Manager to get the job done where I did this using the Import, “register only” functionality.

This is the first step by step that describes the official way. You can read about the process here:

How to Move Highly Available (Clustered) VMs to Windows Server 2012 with the Cluster Migration Wizard

Windows Server 2012 Cluster Reset Recent Events Feature

There are various small improvements in Windows Server 2012 Failover Clustering that make live a little easier. When playing in the lab one of the things I like to do is break stuff. You know, like pull out the power plug  of a host during a live migration or remove a network cable  for one or more of the networks, flip the power of the switch off and on again, crash the vmms.exe process and other really bad things …Smile Just getting a feel for what happens and how Windows 2012 & Hyper-V responds.

As you can imagine this fills up the cluster event logs real fast. It also informs you in that you’ve had issues in the past 24 hours. Those recent cluster events could not be cleared or set to “acknowledged” up to Windows 2008 R2 except by deleting the log files. Now this has to be done on all nodes and is something you should not do in production and is probably even prohibited. There are environments where this is indeed a “resume generating” action. But it’s annoying that you can leave a client with a healthy looking environment after you have fixed an issue.

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For the lab or environments where event log auditing is a no issue I used to run a little script that would clear the event logs of the lab cluster nodes not to be dealing with to much noise between tests or to leave a GUI that represents the healthy state of the cluster for the customer.

This has become a lot easier and better in Windows Server 2012 we now have a feature for this build in to the Failover Cluster Manager GUI. Just right click the cluster events and select “Reset Recent Events”.

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The good thing is this ignores the recent events before “now” but it does not clear the event log. You can configure the query to show older events again. This is nice during testing in the lab. Even in a production environment where this is a big no-no, you can’t do this you can now get rid of noise from previous issues,focus on the problem you working on or leave the scene with a clean state after fixing an issue without upsetting any auditors.

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Upgrading Hyper-V Cluster Nodes to Windows 8 (Beta) – Part 2

This is a multipart series based on some lab test & work I did.

  1. Part 1 Upgrading Hyper-V Cluster Nodes to Windows Server 8 (Beta) – Part 1
  2. Part 2 Upgrading Hyper-V Cluster Nodes to Windows 8 (Beta) – Part 2
  3. Part 3 Upgrading Hyper-V Cluster Nodes to Windows 8 (Beta) – Part 3

Here’s part two of my adventures while upgrading or rather “transitioning” my Hyper-V cluster nodes to Windows 8. Transition is more correctly as you can not upgrade a cluster, you create a new cluster en recuperate the node. I did however not reinstall them but upgrade them. Why, because I can and I wanted to try it out to see what happens. For production purposes I do advise you to rebuild nodes from scratch using a well defined and automated plan if possible. I already mentioned this in Upgrading Hyper-V Cluster Nodes to Windows Server 8 (Beta) – Part 1

So we stopped Part 1 with a evicted and upgraded node. We’ll want to create a new cluster with that node and then transition the other nodes over to the new Windows 8 cluster one by one, or in batches, depending on how many you can afford to take down at one time. In this part we’ll just build our new Window 8 cluster with a single node. It’s a good thing this is possible as we can start a transition with just one node. This an easy part.

First of all we create a new cluster. I will all look very familiar if you’ve ever created a Windows 2008 (R2) cluster.

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The Create Cluster Wizard appears, read all the advice you want and click “Next”

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We select the node that we evicted from the old cluster and upgraded to Windows 8

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You now run the validation test for your cluster

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Let’s run ‘m all and see what it has to say.

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We get a summary of what notes will be tested and what tests will be run. Click “Next”

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The tests are running.

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We get a pass with some warnings. So we click “View Report” to take a look. It’s OK we only have one node, we don’t have storage yet and networking wise we still need to configure some things but we can create a one node cluster, So click “Finish”

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I named my new cluster “warriors”, the old one was called “warrior”.

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I define the IP Address for the Access Point for administering the cluster

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We’re ready to create the cluster so we click “Next” and the creation process starts

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And we’re informed we’ve have successfully created a cluster. Click Finish. Any experienced cluster builder should find this process very familiar without surprises.

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So now we have a cluster existing out of one node and we haven’t got any storage assigned yet.

We have several options for storage here. We could assign new storage but we cannot do a Quick Storage Migration between cluster using SCVMM2008R2 but that doesn’t fly as SCVMM2008R2 can’t manage Windows 8 clusters and I don’t know if it ever will.  We can do a good old manual or scripted export and import of the VMs what takes a considerable amount of time.

We can recuperate the old storage with the VMs still on there. This could get tricky as no two cluster should be able to see & use the storage at the same time. The benefit could be that we can just use the import type in Windows 8 ("Register the virtual machine in-place" (use the existing unique ID) and be done with it. We’ll try that one. We’ll still have some down time but it should be pretty fast. It’s only from Windows 8 on that we’ll be able to do Shared Nothing Live Migrations between clusters Smile We’ll address that in Part 3.