Live Migration over NIC Team in Switch Independent Mode With Dynamic Load Balancing & Compression in Windows Server 2012 R2

In a previous blog post Live Migration over NIC Team in Switch Independent Mode With Dynamic Load Balancing & TCP/IP in Windows Server 2012 R2 we looked at what Dynamic load balancing mode in NIC teaming can do for us . Especially in a switch independent configuration as until now there was no possibility to leverage the complete bandwidth provided by the NIC team when migrating between only 2 nodes. I that blog we used TCP/IP. Now we’ll configure Compression and see what that does for us.

So we set up a NIC team in switch independent mode with Dynamic load balancing, it’s identical as that one used for the tests with TCP/IP.

Compression basically slashes the live migration times in half at a cost. CPU cycles.And again with Dynamic load balancing we can now also use all member of a NIC team for live migration even in switch independent mode. The speeds for live migrating 6 VMs  with 9GB of memory simultaneously were 12-14 seconds.

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Take a look at the screen shot above. You see 6 VMs coming in to the host where these counters are collected and after that you see them being live migrated away from the host. As we have plenty of idle cycles I this test lab they get used, both when being the target and the source of the VMs being live migrated. You can also see that a lot less bandwidth is needed to achieve a faster live migration experience (compared to TCP/IP).

By the looks of it the extra bandwidth will help out when we have less CPU and vice versa. This is both the case for a single NIC or teamed NICs. Do note that you cannot combine compression with Multichannel. That means that the only scenario allowing for multiple NICs to be used with compression is NIC teaming. When you have a bunch  of free 1Gbps NICs in surplus this might get things moving for you!

Interesting stuff. I’m really looking forward to the moment we can run production loads on these configurations …

Live Migration over NIC Team in Switch Independent Mode With Dynamic Load Balancing & TCP/IP in Windows Server 2012 R2

As you can imagine I was quite interested in seeing what the new Dynamic load balancing mode in NIC teaming can do for us. Especially in a switch independent configuration as until now there was no possibility to leverage the complete bandwidth provided by the NIC team when migrating between only 2 nodes.

So we set up  a NIC team in switch independent mode with Dynamic load balancing. Here’s a screenshot of the NIC team setup. LM is the NIC team I’m using for some live migration testing.image

For these tests we used TCP/IP to do the live migrations. I’ll be sharing the compression & Multichannel performance option results in a later blog and do some comparisons. But for now I can inform you that with Dynamic load balancing we can now also use all member of a NIC team for live migration even in switch independent mode. I’m a fan of switch independent mode. Now possibly even more. Speeds for live migrating 6 VMs simultaneously with 9GB of memory were 28-30 seconds.image

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The CPU load not very low but RSS does it’s job to spread it out.image

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Now the beauty of al this is that this had no negative impact due to out of order packets. For one a single live migration sticks to a single team member. Here’s a screenshot of a single VM live migrated over a NIC Team with Dynamic load balancing.image

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As you can see there will not be out of order packets in this case.

Secondly the Dynamic load balancing mode is based on the “flowlets”. This means that the impact due to out or order /reordering of TCP/IP packets is minimal.

I also refer you to the following article Dynamic Load Balancing Without Packet Reordering.The conclusion is quite interesting:

We have introduced the concept of flowlet-switching and developed an algorithm which utilizes flowlets in traffic splitting. Our work reveals several interesting conclusions. First,highly accurate traffic splitting can be implemented with little to no impact on TCP packet reordering and with negligible state overhead. Next, flowlets can be used to make load balancing more responsive, and thus help enable a new generation of real-time adaptive traffic engineering. Finally, the existence and usefulness of flowlets show that TCP burstiness is not necessarily a bad thing, and can in fact be used advantageously.

And now as a show closer let’s do live migrations between both hosts in both directions.image

Speed people, in live migration is a thing of beauty. Microsoft is really providing us with lots of options. This is good. We can use what’s available, where available, when available and make sure we get the best possible solution and performance whatever the environment and budget.

Configuring Performance Options for Live Migration In Windows Server 2012 R2 Preview

New Options For Optimizing Live Migrations

In Windows Server 2012 R2 we have a whole range of options to leverage Live Migration of our environment and needs. Next to the new default (Compression) we can now also leverage SMB 3.0 (Multichannel, RDMA) for all forms of Live Migration and not just for Shared Nothing Live Migration  (see  Shared Nothing Live Migration Leverages SMB 3.0 Under the Hood) or Storage Live Migration when both the source and the target are SMB 3.0 storage.

TCP/IP

Here you can use a one NIC or a NIC Team for bandwidth aggregation for live migration (see  Teamed NIC Live Migrations Between Two Hosts In Windows Server 2012 Do Use All Members). This is the process you have known in Windows Server 2012. You can select multiple NICs or even Teams of NICs  but only one of those (one NIC or one Team) will be used. The other(s)will only be used when the first one is not available.

Compression

This option leverages spare CPU cycles to compress the memory contents of virtual machines being migrated. Only then is it sent over the wire via TCP/IP connection. This speeds up the Live Migration Process. This process is CPU load aware so it will only use idle cycles to protect the workload on the hosts. This is the default setting in Hyper-V running on Windows Server 2012 R2 Preview.

SMB

This setting will leverage two SMB 3.0 features. Multichannel and, if supported by and for the NICs involved, RDMA.

  • SMB Direct (RDMA) will be used when the network adapters of both the source and destination servers have Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) capabilities enabled.
  • SMB Multichannel will automatically detect and use multiple connections when a proper SMB Multichannel configuration is identified.

Where to set these options?

In Hyper-V Manager go to “Hyper-V Settings” in the Actions pane.image

Expand the Live Migrations node under Server in the left pane (click the “+”) and select to “Advanced Features”.image

Select the option desired under" “Performance Options”.image

Happy testing!

 

EDIT: Aidan Finn posted the PowerShell commands to configure the performance options in Configuring WS2012 R2 Hyper-V Live Migration Performance Options Using PowerShell The MVP community at work & it rocks Smile

Teamed NIC Live Migrations Between Two Hosts In Windows Server 2012 Do Use All Members

Introduction

Between this blog NIC Teaming in Windows Server 2012 Brings Simple, Affordable Traffic Reliability and Load Balancing to your Cloud Workloads which states TCP/IP can recover from missing or out-of-order packets. However, out-of-order packets seriously impact the throughput of the connection. Therefore, teaming solutions make every effort to keep all the packets associated with a single TCP stream on a single NIC so as to minimize the possibility of out-of-order packet delivery. So, if your traffic load comprises of a single TCP stream (such as a Hyper-V live migration), then having four 1Gb/s NICs in an LACP team will still only deliver 1 Gb/s of bandwidth since all the traffic from that live migration will use one NIC in the team. However, if you do several simultaneous live migrations to multiple destinations, resulting in multiple TCP streams, then the streams will be distributed amongst the teamed NICsand other information out their such as support forum replies it is dictated that when you live migrate between two nodes in a cluster only one stream is active and you will never exceed the bandwidth of a single team member. When running some simple tests with a 10Gbps NIC team this seems true. We also know that you can consume near to all of the aggregated bandwidth of the members in a NIC Team for live migration if you these conditions are met:

1. The Live Migrations must not all be destined for the same remote machine. Live migration will only use one TCP stream between any pair of hosts. Since both Windows NIC Teaming and the adjacent switch will not spread traffic from a single stream across multiple interfaces live migration between host A and host B, no matter how many VMs you’re migrating, will only use one NIC’s bandwidth.

2. You must use Address Hash (TCP ports) for the NIC Teaming. Hyper-V Port mode will put all the outbound traffic, in this case, on a single NIC.

When we look at these conditions and compare them to the behavior we expect from the various forms of NIC teaming in Windows 2012 this is a bit surprising as one might expect all member to be involved. So let’s take a look at some of the different NIC Teaming setups.

Any form of NIC teaming with Hyper-V Port Mode

This one is easy as condition 2 above is very much true. In all my testing with any NIC team configuration in the Hyper-V Port mode traffic distribution algorithms I have not been able to exceed 10Gbps. I have seen no difference between dependent static of LACP mode or switch independent (active-active) for this condition. As you can see in the screenshot below, the traffic maxes out at 10Gbps.

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This is also demonstrated in the following screenshots taking with the resource manager where you can see only half of the bandwidth of the Team is being used.

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Exceeding a single NIC team member’s bandwidth when migrating between 2 nodes

The first condition of the previous heading doesn’t seem true. In some easy testing with a low number of virtual machines and not too much memory assigned you never exceed the bandwidth of one 10Gbps NIC team member. So on the surface, with some quick testing it might seem that way.

But during testing on a 2 node cluster with dual port 10Gbps cards and I have found the following

Switch Dependent LACP and Static

  1. Take a sufficient number of large memory virtual machines to exceed the capacity of a single 10Gbps pipe for a longer time (that way you’ll see it in the GUI).
  2. Live migrate them all from host A to host B (“Pause” with “Drain Roles” or “select all” + “Move”)
  3. Note that with a 2 node cluster there is no possibility to Live Migrate to multiple nodes simultaneous. It’s A to or B or B to A or both at the same time.

Basically it didn’t take long to see well over 10Gbpsbeing used. So the information out there seems to be wrong. Yes we can leverage the aggregated bandwidth when we migrate from host A to host B as long as we have enough memory assigned to the VMs and we migrate a sufficient number of them. Switch dependent teaming, whether it is static or LACP does its job as you would expect.

Let’s think about this. The number of VMs you need to lie migrate to see > 10Gbpss used is not fixed in stone. Could it be that there is some intelligence in the Live Migration algorithm where it decides to set up multiple streams when a certain number of virtual machines with sufficient memory are migrated as the sorting is mitigated by the amount of bandwidth that can leveraged? Perhaps he VMMS.EXE kicks off more streams when needed/beneficial? Further experimenting indicates that this is not the case. All you need is > 1 VM being live migrated. When looking at this in task manager you do need them to be of sufficient memory size and/or migrate enough of them to make it visible. I have also tried playing with the number of allowed simultaneous live migrations to see if this has an effect but I did not find one (i.e. 4, 6 or 12).

It looks like it is more like one TCP/IP connection per Live Migration that is indeed tied to one NIC member. So when you live migrate VMS between two hosts you see one VM live migration go over 1 member and the other the other as static/LACP switch dependent teaming did does its job. When you do enough live migrations of large VMs simultaneously you see this in Task Manager as shown below. In this case as each VM live migration stream sticks to a NIC team member you do not need to worry about out of order packets impacting performance.

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But to make sure and to prevent falling victim to the fall victim to the limits of the task manger GUI during testing this behavior we also used performance monitor to see what’s going on. This confirms we are indeed using both 10Gbps NIC team member on both the target and the source host server. This is even the case with 2 virtual machines Live Migration. As long as it’s more than one and the memory assigned is enough to make the live migration last long enough you can see it in Task Manager; otherwise it might miss it. Performance Monitor however does not..clip_image012

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This is interesting and frankly a bit unexpected as the documentation on this subject is not reflecting this. However it IS in agreement with the NIC teaming documented behavior for other tan Live Migration traffic. We took a closer look however and can reproduce this over and over again. Again we tested both switch dependent static and LACP modes and we found the behavior to be the same.

Switch Independent with Address Hash

Let’s test Live Migration over switch independent teaming with Address Hash. Here we see that the source server sends on the two member of the NIC team but that the target server receives on only one. This is normal behavior for switch independent teaming. But from the documentation we expect that one member on the source server would send and one member on the target server would receive. Not so.

Basically with Windows Server 2012 this doesn’t give you any benefit for throughput. You are limited to the bandwidth of one member, i.e. 10Gbps.

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Red is Total Bytes received on the target host. It’s clear only one member is being used. Green is Bytes Sent/Sec on the source server. As you can see both team members are involved. In a switch independent scenario the receiving side limits the throughput. This is in agreement the documented behavior of switch independent NIC teaming with Address hash.

Helpful documentation on this is Windows Server 2012 NIC Teaming (LBFO) Deployment and Management (A Guide to Windows Server 2012 NIC Teaming for the novice and the expert).

Hope this helps sort out some of the confusion.