Optimizing Backups: PowerShell Script To Move All Virtual Machines On A Cluster Shared Volume To The Node Owing That CSV

When you are optimizing the number of snapshots to be taken for backups or are dealing with storage vendors software that leveraged their hardware VSS provider you some times encounter some requirements that are at odds with virtual machine mobility and dynamic optimization.

For example when backing up multiple virtual machines leveraging a single CSV snapshot you’ll find that:

  • Some SAN vendor software requires that the virtual machines in that job are owned by the same host or the backup will fail.
  • Backup software can also require that all virtual machines are running on the same node when you want them to be be protected using a single CSV snap shot. The better ones don’t let the backup job fail, they just create multiple snapshots when needed but that’s less efficient and potentially makes you run into issues with your hardware VSS provider.

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VEEAM B&R v8 in action … 8 SQL Server VMs with multiple disks on the same CSV being backed up by a single hardware VSS writer snapshot (DELL Compellent 6.5.20 / Replay Manager 7.5) and an off host proxy Organizing & orchestrating backups requires some effort, but can lead to great results.

Normally when designing your cluster you balance things out a well as you can. That helps out to reduce the needs for constant dynamic optimizations. You also make sure that if at all possible you keep all files related to a single VM together on the same CSV.

Naturally you’ll have drift. If not you have a very stable environment of are not leveraging the capabilities of your Hyper-V cluster. Mobility, dynamic optimization, high to continuous availability are what we want and we don’t block that to serve the backups. We try to help out to backups as much a possible however. A good design does this.

If you’re not running a backup every 15 minutes in a very dynamic environment you can deal with this by live migrating resources to where they need to be in order to optimize backups.

Here’s a little PowerShell snippet that will live migrate all virtual machines on the same CSV to the owner node of that CSV. You can run this as a script prior to the backups starting or you can run it as a weekly scheduled task to prevent the drift from the ideal situation for your backups becoming to huge requiring more VSS snapshots or even failing backups. The exact approach depends on the storage vendors and/or backup software you use in combination with the needs and capabilities of your environment.

cls

$Cluster = Get-Cluster
$AllCSV = Get-ClusterSharedVolume -Cluster $Cluster

ForEach ($CSV in $AllCSV)
{
    write-output "$($CSV.Name) is owned by $($CSV.OWnernode.Name)"
    
    #We grab the friendly name of the CSV
    $CSVVolumeInfo = $CSV | Select -Expand SharedVolumeInfo
    $CSVPath = ($CSVVolumeInfo).FriendlyVolumeName

    #We deal with the \ being and escape character for string parsing.
    $FixedCSVPath = $CSVPath -replace '\\', '\\'

    #We grab all VMs that who's owner node is different from the CSV we're working with
    #From those we grab the ones that are located on the CSV we're working with
      $VMsToMove = Get-ClusterGroup | ? {($_.GroupType –eq 'VirtualMachine') -and ( $_.OwnerNode -ne $CSV.OWnernode.Name)} | Get-VM | Where-object {($_.path -match $FixedCSVPath)} 
     
    ForEach ($VM in $VMsToMove)

    {
        write-output "`tThe VM $($VM.Name) located on $CSVPath is not running on host $($CSV.OwnerNode.Name) who owns that CSV"
        write-output "`tbut on $($VM.Computername). It will be live migrated."
        #Live migrate that VM off to the Node that owns the CSV it resides on
        Move-ClusterVirtualMachineRole -Name $VM.Name -MigrationType Live -Node $CSV.OWnernode.Name
    }

Now there is a lot more to discuss, i.e. what and how to optimize for virtual machines that are clustered. For optimal redundancy you’ll have those running on different nodes and CSVs. But even beyond that, you might have the clustered VMs running on different cluster, which is the failure domain.  But I get the remark my blogs are wordy and verbose so … that’s for another time Winking smile

Azure Automation Scheduled Runbook PowerShell Script to automatically update site-to-site VPN Local Network VPN Gateway Address with dynamic public IP

You can download the script at the end of the article. When you’re connecting a home (or perhaps even an office) lab to Azure with a site-2-site VPN you’ll probably have to deal with the fact that you have a dynamic IP assigned by your ISP. This means unless you update the VPN Gateway Address of your Azure local network in some automated way, your connection is down very often and you’re faced with this this in Azure …

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which on my DELL SonicWALL NSA 220 that looks like this …

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A fellow MVP of mine (Christopher Keyaert) has written a PowerShell script that a few years back that updated the VPN gateway address of your Azure local network via a scheduled task inside of his Windows RRAS VM. Any VM, either in Azure or in your lab will do. Good stuff! If you need inspiration for a script  you have a link. But, I never liked the fact that keeping my Azure site-to-site VPN up and running was tied to a VM being on line in Azure or in my lab, which is also why I switched to a SonicWALL device. Since we have Azure Automation runbooks at our disposal I decided to automate the updating of the VPN gateway address to the dynamic IP address of my ISP using a runbook.

Finding out your dynamic IP address from anywhere in the world

For this to work you need a way to find out what your currently assigned dynamic IP is. For that I subscribe to a free service providing dynamic DNS updates. I use https://www.changeip.com/. That means that by looking up the FQDN is find can out my current dynamic IP address form where ever I have internet access. As my SonicWALL supports dynamic DNS services providers I can configure it there, no need for an update client running in a VM or so.

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The runbook to update the VPN Gateway Address of your Azure local network

I will not deal with how to set up Azure Automation, just follow this link. I will share a little hurdle I needed to take. At least for me it was a hurdle. That hurdle was that the Set-AzureVNetConfig cmdlet which we need has a mandatory parameter -ConfigurationPath which reads the configuration to set from an XML file (see Azure Virtual Network Configuration Schema).

You cannot just use a file path in an Azure runbook to dump a file on c:\temp  for example. Using an Azure file share seems overly complicated for this job. After pinging some fellow MVPs at Inovativ Belgium who are deep into Azure automation on a daily basis, Stijn Callebaut gave me the tip to use [System.IO.Path]::GetTempFileName() and that got my script working. Thank you Stijn Winking smile!

So I now have a scheduled runbook that automatically updates my to the dynamic IP address my ISP renews every so often without needing to have a script running scheduled inside a VM. I don’t always need a VM running but I do need that VPN to be there for other use cases. This is as elegant of a solution that I could come up with.

I test the script before publishing & scheduling it by setting the VPN Gateway Address of my Azure local network to a wrong IP address in order to see whether the runbook changes it to the current one it got from my dynamic IP. As you can see it was successful.

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Now publish it and have it run x times a day … depending on how aggressive your ISP renews your IP address and how long your lab can sustain the Azure site-to-site VPN to be down. I do it hourly. Not a production ready solution, but neither is a dynamic IP and this is just my home lab!

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Now my VPN looks happy most of the time automatically

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Download the runbook  here (zipped PowerShell script)

Windows Server 2012 R2 Cluster Reset Recent Events With PowerShell

I blogged before about the fact that since Windows Server 2012  we have the ability to reset the recent events shown so that the state of the cluster is squeaky clean with not warnings or errors. You can read up on this here. Windows Server 2012 Cluster Reset Recent Events Feature.

You can also do this in PowerShell like in the example below:

#Connect to cluster & get current RecentEventsResetTime value
$MyCluster = Get-CLuster -name "W2K12R2RTM"
$MyCluster.RecentEventsResetTime

#Reset recent events
$MyCluster.RecentEventsResetTime = get-date
$MyCluster.RecentEventsResetTime

 

 

 

 

As you may notice, the RecentEventsResetTime is displayed in UTC when read form the cluster after connecting to it. Right after you set it it displays the time respectful of the time zone you’re in right until you connect to the cluster again. We demonstrate this in the 2 screenshots below (I’m at GMT+1).

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This comes in handy when writing test, comparison & demo scripts. Often you do things with the network that causes network connectivity to be lost when the NIC gets reset (disabled/enabled) and such. Also when something fails as part of the demo or tests scripts it’s nice to start the rerun or the next part of the demo/test with a clean cluster GUI when you’re showcasing stuff. Unfortunately an already GUI doesn’t refresh these setting if the reset is not done in the GUI. So you need to open a new one. For scripting you don’t have this issue. EDIT: In Windows 2012 R2 you can use the $MyCluster.Update() to reflect the new value of RecentEventsResetTime in UTC without having to reconnect to the cluster. In Windows Server 2012 this Update method isn’t available but it seems to happen automatic.

Preventing Live Migration Over SMB Starving CSV Traffic in Windows Server 2012 R2 with Set-SmbBandwidthLimit

One of the big changes in Windows Server 2012 R2 is that all types of Live Migration can now leverage SMB 3.0 if the right conditions are met. That means that Multichannel & SMB Direct (RDMA) come in to play more often and simultaneously. Shared Nothing Live Migration & certain forms of Storage Live Migration are often a lot more planned due to their nature. So one can mitigate the risk by planning.  Good old standard Live Migration of virtual machines however is often less planned. It can be done via Cluster Aware Updating, to evacuate a host for hardware maintenance, via Dynamic optimization. This means it’s often automated as well. As we have demonstrated many times Live Migration can (easily) fill 20Gbps of bandwidth. If you are sharing 2*10Gbps NICs for multiple purposes like CSV, LM, etc. Quality of Service (QoS) comes in to play. There are many ways to achieve this but in our example here I’ll be using DCB  for SMB Direct with RoCE.

New-NetQosPolicy “CSV” –NetDirectPortMatchCondition 445 -PriorityValue8021Action 4
Enable-NetQosFlowControl –Priority 4
New-NetQoSTrafficClass "CSV" -Priority 4 -Algorithm ETS -Bandwidth 40
Enable-NetAdapterQos –InterfaceAlias SLOT41-CSV1+LM2
Enable-NetAdapterQos –InterfaceAlias SLOT42-LM1+CSV2
Set-NetQosDcbxSetting –willing $False

Now as you can see I leverage 2*10Gbps NIC, non teamed as I want RDMA. I have Failover/redundancy/bandwidth aggregation thanks to SMB 3.0. This works like a charm. But when leveraging Live Migration over SMB in Windows Server 2012 R2 we note that the LM traffic also goes over port 445 and as such is dealt with by the same QoS policy on the server & in the switches (DCB/PFC/ETS). So when both CSV & LM are going one how does one prevent LM form starving CSV traffic for example? Especially in Scale Out File Server Scenario’s this could be a real issue.

The Solution

To prevent LM traffic & CSV traffic from hogging all the SMB bandwidth ruining the SOFS party in R2 Microsoft introduced some new capabilities in Windows Server 2012 R2. In the SMBShare module you’ll find:

  • Set-SmbBandwidthLimit
  • Get-SmbBandwidthLimit
  • Remove-SmbBandwidthLimit

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To use this you’ll need to install the Feature called SMB Bandwidth Limit via Server Manager or using PowerShell:  Add-WindowsFeature FS-SMBBW

You can limit SMB bandwidth for Virtual machine (Storage IO to a SOFS), Live Migration & Default (all the rest).  In the below example we set it to 8Gbps maximum.

Set-SmbBandwidthLimit -Category LiveMigration -BytesPerSecond 1000MB

So there you go, we can prevent Live Migration from hogging all the bandwidth. Jose Baretto mentions this capability on his recent blog post on Windows Server 2012 R2 Storage: Step-by-step with Storage Spaces, SMB Scale-Out and Shared VHDX (Virtual). But what about Fibre Channel or iSCSI environments?  It might not be the total killer there as in SOFS scenario but still. As it turns out the Set-SmbBandwidthLimit also works in those scenarios. I was put on the wrong track by thinking it was only for SOFS scenarios but my fellow MVP Carsten Rachfahl kindly reminded me of my own mantra “Trust but verify” and as a result, I can confirm it even works to cap off Live Migration traffic over SMB that leverages RDMA (RoCE). So don’t let the PowerShell module name (SMBShare) fool you, it’s about all SMB traffic within the categories.

So without limit LM can use all bandwidth (2*10Gbps)

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With Set-SmbBandwidthLimit -Category LiveMigration -BytesPerSecond 1250MB you can see we max out at 10Gbps (2*5Gbps).
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Some Remarks

I’d love to see a minimum bandwidth implementation of this (that could include safety buffer for spikes in CSV traffic with SOFS). The hard cap limit might lead to some wasted bandwidth. In other scenarios you could still get into trouble. What if you have 2*10Gbps available but one of those dies on you and you capped Live Migration Traffic at 16Gbps. With one NIC gone you’re potentially in trouble until the NIC has been replaced. OK, this is not a daily occurrence & depending on you environment & setup this is less or more of a potential issue.