July 2016 update rollup for Windows RT 8.1, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2

Microsoft recently released another update rollup (aka cumulative update). The

July 2016 update rollup for Windows RT 8.1, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2.

This rollup includes improvements and fixes but more importantly it also contains ‘improvements’ from June 2016 update rollup KB3161606 and May 2016 update rollup KB3156418. When it comes to the June rollup KB3161606 it’s fixes the bugs that cause concerns with Hyper-V Integration Components (IC) to even serious down time to Scale Out File Server (SOFS) users. My fellow MVP Aidan Finn discuses this in this blog post. Let’s say it caused a wrinkle in the community.

In short with KB3161606 the Integration Components needed an upgrade (to 6.3.9600.18339) but due to a mix up with the manifest files this failed. You could leave them in pace but It’s messy. To make matters worse this cumulative update also messed up SOFS deployments which could only be dealt with by removing it.

Bring in update rollup 3172614. This will install on hosts and guest whether they have  already installed or not and it fixes these issues. I have now deployed it on our infrastructure and the IC’s updated successfully to 6.3.9600.18398. The issues with SOFS are also resolved with this update. We have not seen any issues so far.

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In short, CU should be gone from Windows Update and WSUS. It it was already installed you don’t need to remove it. CU will install on those servers (hosts and guests) and this time is does things right.

I hope this leads to better QA in Redmond as it really is causing a lot of people grief at the moment. It also feed conspiracy nuts theories that MSFT is sabotaging on-premises to promote Azure usage even more. Let’s not feed the trolls shall we?

Video Spam in my WordPress blog comments?

Last night I noticed that a lot of my comments seemed to have random Vimeo video’s embedded into the comments. Sometimes one, some times many. At first you think somebody would use embedding Vimeo embedding code/tags to do so but it was very wide spread over many comments over the years.

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So was I hacked? Nope. I did find no evidence of that and I also did not find any hidden code/tags. It turns out to be a Jetpack 3.9.5 bug and the fix was to either disable or get a new version of Jetpack that would fix the issue: Jetpack 3.9.5 and 3.9.6: Maintenance Releases

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As 3.9.6 was available today I upgraded to that version to see if that would also fix this annoying issue.

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After updating to Jetpack 3.9.6 the issue has indeed gone. Good news!

RD Gateway Management Console crashes with .NET framework 4.6.1 update (KB3102467)

 

UPDATE: KB – the June 2016 update rollup KB 3161606  June 2016 update rollup for Windows RT 8.1, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2  contains the fix for this. See KB3162871 RD Gateway Manager console crashes with the latest .NET Framework 4.6.1 update on Windows Server 2012 R2 

Apparently the Exchange console and Skype for Business Server  2015 is not the only victim of Microsoft pushing out the .NET framework 4.6.1 update (KB3102467) to servers via Windows updates and WSUS. A colleague of mine described Windows updates as a game of Russian roulette, indicating there’s al least a QA concern …

The most recent victim I found was the RD Gateway management console on Windows Server 2012 R2. You might have the same issue on older Windows Versions but I’m only running W2K12R2 (it’s 2016 after all).

The result is that when you’re editing a Connection Authorization Policies or Resource Authorization Policies their membership settings (adding/removing groups) the MMC just crashes. Creating new ones is equally problematic!

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You see the following errors logged in the event viewer:

Faulting application name: mmc.exe, version: 6.3.9600.17415, time stamp: 0x54504e26
Faulting module name: clr.dll, version: 4.6.1055.0, time stamp: 0x563c12de
Exception code: 0xc0000409
Fault offset: 0x00000000002fdbd8
Faulting process id: 0x12ec
Faulting application start time: 0x01d166820b2de977
Faulting application path: C:\Windows\system32\mmc.exe
Faulting module path: C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\clr.dll
Report Id: 57bbb59c-d275-11e5-9440-00155dd2ca06
Faulting package full name:
Faulting package-relative application ID:

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Followed by

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The culprit once again is the .NET Framework  4.6.1 update (KB3102467)  for Microsoft Windows.

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Get rid of that update to restore functionality. Come on Microsoft, Quality assurance! You need people to update ever faster for both security reasons and in order to keep up with technologies and the cloud cadence. You need to make sure they can do so without worrying all the time!

WEBINAR: Troubleshooting Microsoft Hyper-V – 4 Tales from the Trenches

I’ve teamed up with Altaro as a guest in one of their Hyper-V webinars to discuss trouble shooting Microsoft Hyper-V. I’ll be joining my fellow Microsoft Cloud and Datacenter Management  Andy Syrewicze for this in a virtual cross Atlantic team

WEBINAR: Troubleshooting Microsoft Hyper-V - 4 Tales from the Trenches

We’ll give you some pointers on good practices and where to start when things go south. We’ll also add some real world examples to the mix to spice things up. As you can imagine these issues are often a lot more fun after the facts and after having solved them. If you work in IT long enough you know that one day (or night) trouble will come knocking and that the stress related with that can be gut wrenching.

The good news is that it isn’t the end of the world. In well designed and managed environment you can minimize downtime and you do not have to suffer through unrecoverable losses as long as you’re well prepared. We hope this webinar will help the attendees prevent those problems in their environment. If not, it will provide you with some insight on how to prepare for and handle them.

The webinar is on February 25th, 2016 at 4pm CET / 10am EST!

The time has been chosen to make it feasible for as many many people across all time zones to attend. So, go on, register, it’s free and both Andy and I are looking forward to sharing our trouble shooting tales from the trenches.

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