Dell Storage Replay Manager 7.6.0.47 for Compellent 6.5

Recently as a DELL Compellent customer version 7.6.0.47 became available to us. I download it and found some welcome new capabilities in the release notes.

  • Support for vSphere 6
  • 2024 bit public key support for SSL/TLS
  • The ability to retry failed jobs (Microsoft Extensions Only)
  • The ability to modify a backup set (Microsoft Extensions Only)

The ability to retry failed jobs is handy. There might be a conflicting backup running via a 3rd party tool leveraging the hardware VSS provider. So the ability to retry can mitigate this. As we do multiple replays per day and have them scheduled recurrently we already mitigated the negative effects of this, but this only gibes us more options to deal with such situations. It’s good.

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The ability to modify a backup set is one I love. It was just so annoying not to be able to do this before. A change in the environment meant having to create a new backup set. That also meant keeping around the old job for as long as you wanted to retain the replays associated with that job. Not the most optimal way of handling change I’d say, so this made me happy when I saw it.

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Now I’d like DELL to invest a bit more in make restore of volume based replays of virtual machines easier. I actually like the volume based ones with Hyper-V as it’s one snapshot per CSV for all VMs and it doesn’t require all the VMs to reside on the host where we originally defined the backup set. Optimally you do run all the VMs on the node that own the CSV but otherwise it has less restrictions. I my humble opinion anything that restricts VM mobility is bad and goes against the grain of virtualization and dynamic optimization. I wonder if this has more to do with older CVS/Hyper-V versions, current limitations in Windows Server Hyper-V or CVS or a combination. This makes for a nice discussion, so if anyone from MSFT & the DELL Storage team responsible for Repay Manager wants to have one, just let me know Smile 

Last but not least I’d love DELL to communicate in Q4 of 2015 on how they will integrate their data protection offering in Compellent/Replay manager with Windows Server 2016 Backup changes and enhancements. That’s quite a change that’s happing for Hyper-V and it would be good for all to know what’s being done to leverage that. Another thing that is high on my priority for success is to enable leveraging replays with Live Volumes. For me that’s the biggest drawback to Live Volumes: having to chose between high/continuous availability and application consistent replays for data protection and other use cases).

I have some more things on my wish list but these are out of scope in regards to the subject of this blog post.

Optimizing Backups: PowerShell Script To Move All Virtual Machines On A Cluster Shared Volume To The Node Owing That CSV

When you are optimizing the number of snapshots to be taken for backups or are dealing with storage vendors software that leveraged their hardware VSS provider you some times encounter some requirements that are at odds with virtual machine mobility and dynamic optimization.

For example when backing up multiple virtual machines leveraging a single CSV snapshot you’ll find that:

  • Some SAN vendor software requires that the virtual machines in that job are owned by the same host or the backup will fail.
  • Backup software can also require that all virtual machines are running on the same node when you want them to be be protected using a single CSV snap shot. The better ones don’t let the backup job fail, they just create multiple snapshots when needed but that’s less efficient and potentially makes you run into issues with your hardware VSS provider.

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VEEAM B&R v8 in action … 8 SQL Server VMs with multiple disks on the same CSV being backed up by a single hardware VSS writer snapshot (DELL Compellent 6.5.20 / Replay Manager 7.5) and an off host proxy Organizing & orchestrating backups requires some effort, but can lead to great results.

Normally when designing your cluster you balance things out a well as you can. That helps out to reduce the needs for constant dynamic optimizations. You also make sure that if at all possible you keep all files related to a single VM together on the same CSV.

Naturally you’ll have drift. If not you have a very stable environment of are not leveraging the capabilities of your Hyper-V cluster. Mobility, dynamic optimization, high to continuous availability are what we want and we don’t block that to serve the backups. We try to help out to backups as much a possible however. A good design does this.

If you’re not running a backup every 15 minutes in a very dynamic environment you can deal with this by live migrating resources to where they need to be in order to optimize backups.

Here’s a little PowerShell snippet that will live migrate all virtual machines on the same CSV to the owner node of that CSV. You can run this as a script prior to the backups starting or you can run it as a weekly scheduled task to prevent the drift from the ideal situation for your backups becoming to huge requiring more VSS snapshots or even failing backups. The exact approach depends on the storage vendors and/or backup software you use in combination with the needs and capabilities of your environment.

cls

$Cluster = Get-Cluster
$AllCSV = Get-ClusterSharedVolume -Cluster $Cluster

ForEach ($CSV in $AllCSV)
{
    write-output "$($CSV.Name) is owned by $($CSV.OWnernode.Name)"
    
    #We grab the friendly name of the CSV
    $CSVVolumeInfo = $CSV | Select -Expand SharedVolumeInfo
    $CSVPath = ($CSVVolumeInfo).FriendlyVolumeName

    #We deal with the \ being and escape character for string parsing.
    $FixedCSVPath = $CSVPath -replace '\\', '\\'

    #We grab all VMs that who's owner node is different from the CSV we're working with
    #From those we grab the ones that are located on the CSV we're working with
      $VMsToMove = Get-ClusterGroup | ? {($_.GroupType –eq 'VirtualMachine') -and ( $_.OwnerNode -ne $CSV.OWnernode.Name)} | Get-VM | Where-object {($_.path -match $FixedCSVPath)} 
     
    ForEach ($VM in $VMsToMove)

    {
        write-output "`tThe VM $($VM.Name) located on $CSVPath is not running on host $($CSV.OwnerNode.Name) who owns that CSV"
        write-output "`tbut on $($VM.Computername). It will be live migrated."
        #Live migrate that VM off to the Node that owns the CSV it resides on
        Move-ClusterVirtualMachineRole -Name $VM.Name -MigrationType Live -Node $CSV.OWnernode.Name
    }

Now there is a lot more to discuss, i.e. what and how to optimize for virtual machines that are clustered. For optimal redundancy you’ll have those running on different nodes and CSVs. But even beyond that, you might have the clustered VMs running on different cluster, which is the failure domain.  But I get the remark my blogs are wordy and verbose so … that’s for another time Winking smile

Some Insights Into How Windows 2012 R2 Hyper-V Backups Work

How Windows Server 2012 R2 backups differ from Windows Server 2012 and earlier

You’ll remember our previous blog about an error when backing up a virtual machine on Windows Server 2012 R2, throwing this error:

Dealing With Event ID 10103 “The virtual machine ‘VM001’ cannot be hot backed up since it has no SCSI controllers attached. Please add one or more SCSI controllers to the virtual machine before performing a backup. (Virtual machine ID DCFE14D3-7E08-845F-9CEE-21E0605817DC)” In Windows Server 2012 R2

The fix was easy enough, adding a virtual SCSI controller to the virtual machine. But why does it need that now?

Well, this all has to do with the changed way Windows Server 2012 R2 backups work. Before Windows Server 20012 R2 the VSS provider created a VSS snapshot inside the guest virtual machine. That snapshot was exposed to the host, to create a volume snapshot for backup purposes. Right after the volume snapshot has been taken this VSS snapshot inside the guest virtual machine needed to be reverted. The backups then run against that volume snapshot and is consistent thanks to both host & guest VSS capabilities.

For an overview of VSS based backup process in general take a peak at Overview of Processing a Backup Under VSS

Now it is the “Hyper-V Integration Services Shadow Copy Provider” that is being used. When the the host initiates a volume snapshot (Microsoft or hardware VSS provider) the host VSS writer goes in to freeze. This process leverages the Hyper-V Integration Services Shadow Copy Provider  to create the virtual machine checkpoint. After that the volume/LUN/CSV snapshot is taken. When that is done the host VSS writes goes into thaw and the virtual machine checkpoint is deleted. After that the backup runs against the Volume snapshot and at the end that is also deleted. You can follow this process quite nicely in the GUI of your Hyper-V host, you SAN (if you use a Hardware VSS provider).

Dear storage vendors: a great, reliable, fast VSS Hardware Provider is paramount to success in a Microsoft environment. You need to get this absolutely right and out of the door before spending any more time and money on achieving yet more IOPS. Keep scalability in mind when doing this.

Dear backup software vendors: think about the scalability when designing your products. If we have 200 or 500 or a thousand VMs … can we leverage CSV based backups to protect every VM on the LUN or do we need to snap the LUN for every VM backed up? Choice there is good for both data protection schemes and scalability.

At this stage the hardware VSS snapshot is being taken …

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Contrary to common belief this means that the backup will indeed application consistent to the time of the checkpoint as the CSV snapshot being taken is of a consistent checkpoint. It’s the delta in the active avhdx that is only crash consistent, like any running VM by the way. Now pay attention to the screenshot below. The two red arrows are indicating to ntfs source events, two volumes seem to be exposed to the next free drive letters. E: and F: here as C: is the virtual machine OS and D: the DVD.

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Look at the detail. Indeed two. Well it the previous screenshot we only saw one in the CSV path but there are two avhdx files indeed.

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Exposing a snapshot on the SAN to a server actually shows us this much better … look here at the avhdx with the GUID and one with “AutoRecovery” in the name. So that makes for two nfts events … and as the backup needs to do this life it requires a vSCSI controller to be present in the virtual machine … and vIDE controller can’t do this.

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Anyway, enough under the hood detective work for now, In VEEAM that stage looks like this:

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And on the Compellent it looks like this. The screenshots are from different backups at different times so don’t get confused about the time stamps here. It’s just as illustration of what you can expect to see.

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Now when the CSV snapshot has been taken the virtual machine checkpoint is removed. At that time the backup runs against the CSV snapshot. In our case (hardware VSS provider) this is a snapshot on the SAN that gets exposed in a view and mapped to the off host backup proxy VEEAM server. On the DELL Compellent it looks like this.

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This takes a while to o…but after a while the backup will kick off. Do not that the checkpoint has merged and is no longer visible at this time.

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Once the backup is complete, the mapping is removed, the view deleted and the snapshot expired. So your SAN is left as the backup found it.

There you go. I hope this helped clarify certain things on how Hyper-V guest backups work in Windows 2012 R2. So your backups are still application consistent, just not when you’re running Linux or DOS or NT4.0 as there is no support / VSS for that. However they are based on a  consistent virtual machine snapshot which explains why Hyper-V backups can protect Linux guests very adequately!

You Got To Love Windows Server 2012 Deduplication for Backups

I’ve discussed this before in Windows Server 2012 Deduplication Results In A Small Environment but here’s a little updated screenshot of a backup volume:

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Not to shabby I’d say and 100% free in box portable deduplication … What are you waiting for Winking smile