Out-of-Band Update MS15-078: Vulnerability in Microsoft font driver could allow remote code execution: July 16, 2015 – KB3079904

This morning at work, with a cup of coffee, I was glancing over the e-mail and was greeted by “ADVANCE NOTIFICATION – Microsoft Out of Band Security Bulletin Release July 20, 2015”


So Microsoft will release an emergency Out-of-Band (OOB) security update today that is valid for all windows versions and deals with a remote code execution vulnerability. It’s marked as critical but there is very little other information for the moment.

Just now it became available via MS15-078: Vulnerability in Microsoft font driver could allow remote code execution: July 16, 2015.

This security update resolves a vulnerability in Windows that could allow remote code execution if a user opens a specially crafted document or goes to an untrusted webpage that contains embedded OpenType fonts. To learn more about the vulnerability, see Microsoft Security Bulletin MS15-078.

This security update is rated Critical for all supported releases of Microsoft Windows. For more information, see the Affected Software section.

Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard
Windows Server 2012 R2 Essentials
Windows Server 2012 R2 Foundation
Windows 8.1 Enterprise
Windows 8.1 Pro
Windows 8.1
Windows RT 8.1
Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
Windows Server 2012 Standard
Windows Server 2012 Essentials
Windows Server 2012 Foundation
Windows 8 Enterprise
Windows 8 Pro
Windows 8
Windows RT
Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1
Windows 7 Service Pack 1
Windows Server 2008 Service Pack 2
Windows Vista Service Pack 2

The funny thing is that is shows up as important and not as critical in Windows Update.


Get you’re due diligence done before rolling it out but don’t delay it for to long! It’s a critical one!

Windows Server vNext Soft Restart – A way to speed up reboots? Not in Technical Preview 9841

As you all probably know I’m also playing around with and testing Windows Server vNext Tech Preview and one of the nice new features in there I have my eye on is Soft Restart.


There is little information on this feature out there right now but from the description “Soft Restart” looks like a way to get faster Windows boot times by cutting down on device firmware initialization. When it’s not needed that would be a great thing to have as with > 10gbps live migration speeds the boot time of our hardware loaded (DRAC, NICs, HBA, BMC, …) servers is what makes it the longest single step per node during cluster aware updating. Interesting if this is indeed what it’s there for.

But let’s find out if this is indeed what we think it is Smile. First of all the installation of this feature requires a restart. Keep this in mind.

There are 2 ways to kick it off that I know of but to me there must be more … it would be a shame not to have this integrated as an option into Cluster Aware Updating for example.

Option 1: via shutdown


So let’s try shutdown /r /soft /t 000.  No joy, doesn’t make one bit of difference and nothing logged or so to indicate an issue.

Option 2: PowerShell via Restart-Computer –Soft

No joy here either …


What could be the problem?

So I figured I needed enterprise grade server hardware with some FC cards & lots of NIC and memory to notice the difference. On a VM it might do nothing, but I assure you I doesn’t do anything on the PC based home lab either. So I dragged a DELL PowerEdge R730 with exactly that into the game. But still no joy. Then I thought some more and decided it might integrate with the hardware capabilities to do so of I went to install the latest and greatest DELL Server Manager software to see if that make a difference. But again, no joy.

It’s probably not lit up yet in this release of the Technical Preview 9841. For now I’ll be content with the 28-30% improved reboot speeds the DELL R730 UEFI brought us. I’d love to speed things up a bit as time is money and valuable Winking smile but we’ll have to wait for the next code drop to see if and how it works …

Windows 2003? Let it go!

Reflecting on some of the discussions I was in recently I can only say that there is no escaping reality. Here are some reference blogs for you.

You can’t get of Windows 2003 you say? Held hostage by ancient software from a previous century?  Sure I understand your problems and perils. But we do not negotiate with hostage takers. We get rid of them. Be realistic, do you think this is somehow going to get any better with age? What in 24 months? What about 48? You get the drift. What’s bad now will only be horrible in x amount of time.

Look at some issues people run into already:

Issues like this are not going to go away, new ones will pop up. Are you going to keep everything in your infrastructure frozen in time to try an avoid these? That’s not even coping, that’s suffering.


What ever it is that’s blocking you, tomorrow is when you start planning to deal with it and execute on that plan. Don’t be paralyzed by fear or indecision. Over 12 years it will have been a supported OS by its end of life. Windows 2003 had a real good run but now it’s over. Let it go before it hurts you. You have no added value from a more recent version of Windows? Really? We need to talk, seriously.

UPDATE: Inspired by Aidan Finn (@joe_elway) who offered a very good picture to get the message across => click the picture to get the soundtrack! LET IT GO!

Embedded image permalink

Failed at dumping XP in a timely fashion? Reassert yourself by doing better with Windows Server 2003!

I could write a blog post that repeats the things I said bout XP here for Windows 2003 with even some more drama attached so I won’t. There’s plenty about that on the internet and you can always read these blogs again:

I also refer you to a old tweet of mine that got picked up by some one and he kind of agreed:


Replace “XP” with “Server 2003” and voila. Instant insight into the situation. You are blocking yourself from moving ahead and it getting worse by the day. All IT systems & solutions rot over time. They become an ever bigger problem to manage and maintain, costing you time, effort, money and lost opportunities due to blocking to progress. There comes a day that creative solutions won’t pop up anymore like the one in this blog post  Windows XP Clients Cannot Execute Logon Scripts against a Windows Server 2012 R2 Domain Controller – Workaround and more recently this on where people just waited to long to move AD over from Windows Server 2003 to something more recent It turns out that weird things can happen when you mix Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2012 R2 domain controllers. All situations where not moving ahead out of fear to break stuff actually broke the stuff.

In the environments I manage I look at the technology stack and plan the technologies that will be upgraded in the coming 12 months in the context of what needs to happen to support & sustain initiatives. This has the advantage that the delta between versions & technologies can never become to big. It avoids risk because it doesn’t let delta grow for 10 years an blocks introducing “solutions” that only supports old technology stacks. It make sure you never fall behind too much, pay off existing technology debt in a timely fashion and opens up opportunities & possibilities. That’s why our AD is running Windows Server 2012 R2 and our ADFS was moved to 3.0 already. It’s not because a lot of things have become commodities you should hand ‘m over to the janitor in break/fix mode. Oh the simplicity by which some wander this earth …


Observe, Orient, Decide, Act. Right now in 2014 we’ve given management and  every product/application owner their marching orders. Move away from any Windows 2008 / R2 server that is still in production. Why? They demand a modern capable infrastructure that can deliver what’s needed to grasp opportunities that exits with current technology. In return they cannot allow apps to block this. It’s as easy and simple as that. And we’ll stick to the 80/20 rule to call it successful and up the effort next year for the remainder. Whether it’s an informal group of dedicated IT staff or a full blown ITIL process that delivers that  doesn’t matter. It’s about the result and if I still see Windows 7 or Windows 2008 R2 being rolled out as a standard I look deeper and often find a slew of Windows 2003 or even Windows 2000 servers, hopefully virtualized by now. But what does this mean? That you’re in a very reactive modus & in a bad place. Courage & plans are what’s needed. Combine this with skills to deal with the fact that no plan ever woks out perfectly. Or as Mike Tyson said “Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth. … Then, like a rat, they stop in fear and freeze.”

Organizations that still run XP and Windows Server 2003 are paralyzed by fear & have frozen even before they got hit. Hiding behind whatever process or methodology they can (or the abuse of it) to avoid failure by doing the absolute minimum for the least possible cost. Somehow they define that as success and it became a mission statement. If you messed up with XP, there’s very little time left to redeem yourself and avoid the same shameful situation with Windows Server 2003. What are you waiting for? Observe, Orient, Decide, Act.